Qinghai-Tibet Railway Set To Begin Trial Operations : News Photo

Qinghai-Tibet Railway Set To Begin Trial Operations

Credit: 
China Photos / Stringer
GANGCHA COUNTY, CHINA - JUNE 17: (CHINA OUT) A freight train runs on the Xining-Golmud section of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, on June 17, 2006 in Gangcha County of Qinghai Province, China. The Qinghai-Tibet railway will begin trial operations on July 1 and schedule has been set for the first five trains to Tibet via the new railway, an official with the Qinghai-Tibet Railway Company said. The 1,956-kilometer-long (about 1,215 miles) Qinghai-Tibet railway, linking Xining, capital of Qinghai Province, with Lhasa, capital of Tibet Autonomous Region, is the world's highest and longest plateau railroad and also the first railway connecting Tibet with other parts of China. Some 960 kilometers (576 miles) of its track are located 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) above sea level and the highest point is 5,072 meters (16,636 feet), according to state media. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
Caption:
GANGCHA COUNTY, CHINA - JUNE 17: (CHINA OUT) A freight train runs on the Xining-Golmud section of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, on June 17, 2006 in Gangcha County of Qinghai Province, China. The Qinghai-Tibet railway will begin trial operations on July 1 and schedule has been set for the first five trains to Tibet via the new railway, an official with the Qinghai-Tibet Railway Company said. The 1,956-kilometer-long (about 1,215 miles) Qinghai-Tibet railway, linking Xining, capital of Qinghai Province, with Lhasa, capital of Tibet Autonomous Region, is the world's highest and longest plateau railroad and also the first railway connecting Tibet with other parts of China. Some 960 kilometers (576 miles) of its track are located 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) above sea level and the highest point is 5,072 meters (16,636 feet), according to state media. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
Calculate price
View basket
Date created:
June 17, 2006
Editorial #:
71231055
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.CHINA OUT
Licence type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Getty Images News
Max file size:
3,000 x 1,949 px (25.40 x 16.50 cm) - 300 dpi - 1.01 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Getty Images AsiaPac
Object name:
71213290LAG043_Railway

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
freight train runs on the XiningGolmud section of the QinghaiTibet... News Photo 71231055Cargo Train,China - East Asia,Chinese Culture,Cross Section,Freight Transportation,Human Interest,Qinghai Province,Railway Track,Run,Train,Waist UpPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2006 China PhotosGANGCHA COUNTY, CHINA - JUNE 17: (CHINA OUT) A freight train runs on the Xining-Golmud section of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, on June 17, 2006 in Gangcha County of Qinghai Province, China. The Qinghai-Tibet railway will begin trial operations on July 1 and schedule has been set for the first five trains to Tibet via the new railway, an official with the Qinghai-Tibet Railway Company said. The 1,956-kilometer-long (about 1,215 miles) Qinghai-Tibet railway, linking Xining, capital of Qinghai Province, with Lhasa, capital of Tibet Autonomous Region, is the world's highest and longest plateau railroad and also the first railway connecting Tibet with other parts of China. Some 960 kilometers (576 miles) of its track are located 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) above sea level and the highest point is 5,072 meters (16,636 feet), according to state media. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)